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I am probably not the only one who is using this fruitful combination for my remote file management and editing jobs, but for those of you who still haven't discovered the benefits of using it here is what the buzz is all about.


Zenwalk is a lightweight desktop oriented Slackware based GNU/Linux distribution that aims to be fast and user friendly. It is still quite new, but the growth, as well as the progress of development, has been pretty fast so far. I've taken a hike with the latest release, Zenwalk 4.0, and here's what I can say about it.


The latest distribution to be endorsed by the Free Soft


Introduction

This tutorial is intended for people with at least basic Unix knowledge, such as mounting filesystems and copying files.

OpenSSH, an OpenBSD project, is an incredibly secure implementation of the SSH protocol, a way of logging into a remote machine. For users of outdated protocols such as RSH, rlogin, and Telnet, it's an updated, secure replacement. For those who have never used anything like it, SSH can become a very valuable tool.


BLAG - An Easy Way to Freedom?

Introduction

BLAG Linux with GNU is a small one CD distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system based upon Fedora Core. The version I'm taking a look at here, BLAG-500000, is based upon Fedora Core 5, with a bunch of packages added from third party sources.

BLAG aims to create a one CD distribution with everything people need for the desktop environment. It also aims to be a 100% Free Software distribution and has been recognized by as doing this on the GNU website, along with only six other distributions of GNU/Linux (http://www.gnu.org/links/links.html#FreeGNULinuxDistributions).

So I thought I'd see if this distribution has what it takes to bring freedom to the desktop, without being a pain to install and use.


At this point there are really only three major contenders on the desktop market; Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X.

Guess what does the following screenshot show?

If "a year of GNU/Linux on the desktop" is defined as a year when GNU/Linux has finally started its steady encroachment to the desktop then 2006 is the year.

In the last few months, there has been a lot of talk about Xgl, compiz, AIGLX et cetera. It seems that "Xgl" has become a synonym for fancy desktop on Linux - but nobody seems to talk about the alternatives or how it all works. I have had a little look into this and am going to summarize it for y'all. I will explain where the following come from and how they work:
  • Xglx
  • Xegl
  • Luminocity
  • AIGLX

Despite the pervasive growth of mind share and even market share of GNU/Linux in various areas of use, and despite all the hype around GNU/Linux reaching the top this year with releases of Ubuntu Dapp