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GNOME-Terminal Knock-Off

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supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

Okay, you guys seem to have proven to me that I don't need Nautilus except for my desktop and my GNOME-panels. Thunar is definitely the ticket for me. However, I noticed that GNOME-terminal is another dog. Got another terminal to replace this? I'm not really happy with xterm because of the way it scrolls vs. how GNOME-terminal scrolls. I'd be curious to see something else.

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Joined: 2005-12-21

Are you running GNOME 2.14 yet? A lot of work has been put into speeding things up, including the GNOME terminal.

On another note, if it is speed you want - you must really be running an old machine or be rather low on RAM. I used to run KDE 3.1 on an old 355 Mhz box with 256 MB or shared RAM (integrated video card). Nowadadys I am running an AMD 2200 with 512 MB RAM and GNOME 2.12.1 and quite frankly I'm quite happy with the speed of the system - otherwise, I really don't understand why you would want to speed things up further.

Cheers.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20

I like Konsole.

tbuitenh's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-21

I use the xfce terminal. It's not exactly as lightweight as xterm, but it should be lighter than the gnome terminal.

http://freshmeat.net/projects/xfceterminal/

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08

you may like xfce-terminal. pretty similiar to gnome-termonal, but I couldn't get zsh to set the terminal's title. I currently use aterm. very simple with support for pseuso-transparency...
If you want tabs, your best bets are xfce-terminal and konsole, otherwise you should have a look at rxvt and aterm. I know both have configurable scrollbard (to some extent).

[ screenshot with my aterm: http://zombiehq.xyzplanet.net/~thomas/flux2.png ]

P.S.: I use screen instead of tabs.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
"klepas" wrote:

Are you running GNOME 2.14 yet? A lot of work has been put into speeding things up, including the GNOME terminal.

On another note, if it is speed you want - you must really be running an old machine or be rather low on RAM. I used to run KDE 3.1 on an old 355 Mhz box with 256 MB or shared RAM (integrated video card). Nowadadys I am running an AMD 2200 with 512 MB RAM and GNOME 2.12.1 and quite frankly I'm quite happy with the speed of the system - otherwise, I really don't understand why you would want to speed things up further.

Cheers.

I'm running 2.12.1. Unfortunately I have a dual proc 800 Mhz (with only one proc inside) Dell PowerEdge 300SC with only 256MB RAM. I'm on an extremely tight budget right now while we try to pay off the USA revenue service (IRS) and some other debts. (One can get wealthier faster by paying down debts first, then moving to investments.) I did have some birthday cash once last year and tried to purchase another 256MB of RAM, but unfortunately the dopes at Dell screwed the order up 3 whole times! My next RAM purchase will be from crucial.com, but the funds have dried up for now.

>>Funny sidebar. There's this woman I work next to in my office. She used MS Access all day. She didn't know much about computers. One day I shared my Dell RAM story with a coworker and she overheard me. She said, "I don't mean to eavesdrop, but have you heard of crucial.com?" I laughed that she was so knowledgable of this company. That's a sensational testament to that company, I tell you. That even an inexperienced, new IT person would even know of it -- that's sensational. I had only heard of the company the night before from one of my Linux guru friends. <<

Anyway, I have a swapfile now double the size of my RAM to make up for the loss. It sped my system up a great deal by doing that.

I do a good bit of PHP/PostgreSQL development, so I have that always running in memory. I've shut down most of the non-essential stuff.

Anyway, this XFCE is pretty neat. I may just switch, wholesale, to it. It has some great features, consumes little RAM, and is snappier. I wonder if I can make the taskbar stretch across the whole bottom of the screen like Gnome Panel can. I also wonder if it has a lot of bugs. This Thunar thing seems to have none so far in my usage.

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08

XFCE is sweet. I prefer fluxbox atm, but that'a another story.
usually, XFCE has one panel and one taskbar; the taskbar can, AFAIK, have abitary width and be on the top or bottom. the panel can be at any of the four screen sides with abitary length. you can replace the tasktar with a panel plugin, which you'd have to compile from source. that would give you a KDE- or windows-style one=panel set up.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
"free-zombie" wrote:

that would give you a KDE- or windows-style one=panel set up.

Yeah, that's what I want. I'm stuck on -- the winblows-style taskbar, unfortunately. It just seems to make the most logical sense to me of screen space utilization. Too bad M$ had to come up with a good idea like this.

I also like to put an invisible panel at the top in GNOME where I stick a bunch of icons for quick launch.

So, if that's my layout, then how on Ubuntu Breezy do I install this so that I can unload GNOME panel and perhaps even GNOME desktop out of memory, replacing them with XFCE in the layout I've suggested?

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

Hey, I just installed pterm. Seems to have what I need and loads fast.

I tried installing xfce4-terminal, but unfortunately it wanted to remove thunar, which I didn't like, so I had to abandon that.

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04

Sounds like you're in a similar situation as I am supermike. Smiling

I have an Athlon XP 2000+ (that's 1.66 Ghz) with 256 MB of which 16 is shared for onboard graphics. Processor is good, but memory is a bit lacking for modern apps so I also have a big swap (I actually went a bit overboard with 2GB swap :mrgreen: )

Xfce is definitely a good lightweight alternative to GNOME/KDE stuff. I also use xfce terminal which I like very much while it still isn't too consuming.

But if you really want to go lightweight all the way I suggest running openbox as your window manager and then just having xfce4-panel be launched whenever you startx (you put it in your ~/.xinitrc file).

Since I am running that things have gotten much better performance wise, except when firefox gets a bit too big and leaky (then I just restart it) Sticking out tongue

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
"free-zombie" wrote:

XFCE is sweet. I prefer fluxbox atm, but that'a another story.
usually, XFCE has one panel and one taskbar; the taskbar can, AFAIK, have abitary width and be on the top or bottom. the panel can be at any of the four screen sides with abitary length. you can replace the tasktar with a panel plugin, which you'd have to compile from source. that would give you a KDE- or windows-style one=panel set up.

If you have the time, I'd love for you to show me how to switch my Ubuntu with the taskbar, menu, systray, and clock at the bottom (ala Winblows) into XFCE with all the plugins in such a way that it spreads across the screen, looking much like the same thing.

And if you know how to replace my GNOME desktop with an XFCE desktop, that would even be greater.

I'm liking Metacity (GNOME's default) for my window manager and I theme it with Glider controls, Clearlooks window border, and Human icons.

What I'm looking for is something like, edit this file, do some apt-gets, do some more edits, etc., and voila -- it's converted.

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08

I have not tried this, just checked the repo

apt-get install xfce4-taskbar-plugin # universe
#user again
killall xfce4-taskbar

you should be able to add the taskbar to the panel and do all the other stup via the xfce control cantre and the panel right-click menu.
I have never used icons on an xfce4 desktop. I would use idesk; if you want I can post my config files for it

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