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How Microsoft is losing to GNU/Linux

If "a year of GNU/Linux on the desktop" is defined as a year when GNU/Linux has finally started its steady encroachment to the desktop then 2006 is the year. A lot of users have started using GNU/Linux on their desktops long before, but it is 2006 which marked the two probably biggest GNU/Linux desktop releases to date, Ubuntu Dapper and Novell SuSE 10. It is 2006 which marks the biggest opportunity for GNU/Linux to steal the desktop market share from Windows due to the bad reputation behind the pending Windows Vista release. And the eyes and focus of both the GNU/Linux community and major GNU/Linux corporations such as Novell are fixed on that opportunity. Novell marketing is true: "Your Linux is ready."

What is happening at this stage is what I would call "cleaning out the pockets" of the market consisted of the remaining advanced desktop computer users. Those are everyone who knows at least enough to be able to install and re-install Windows. Those are the users who don't need to get the OS pre-installed on their computer to be able to run it. Those are the users which are, at an increasing rate, considering trying out GNU/Linux. In alot of cases they are in fact being chased away to GNU/Linux, as this guy will tell you. Microsoft is shooting itself in the foot by being what they are, a *proprietary software* company who actively wants to fight unauthorized copying and use of their software (AKA "piracy"). What their measures against this "piracy" end up causing though is not so much a cease of unauthorized copying, but the steady reduction of their desktop market share, as rigorous measures they have put in place are annoying users away to the free platform readily waiting for them: a Free Software platform which is GNU/Linux.

This mainly affects those advanced users who know the difference between a computer and an operating system that it runs, users who know enough to think and choose for themselves rather than leave the choices to someone else and users on which many "newbie" computer users depend on. In other words, what is happening is that all users who know enough to *choose* are increasingly choosing GNU/Linux.

And this bears more signficance than it seems. If it is those advanced users choosing GNU/Linux who the "newbie" non-choosing computer user depend on, than they will increasingly be choosing GNU/Linux for those users who depend on them. In other words, as advanced users continue to switch to GNU/Linux, more of their less computer advanced friends will be switching as well, sometimes without even realizing the full meaning of the switch. The advanced computer guy that is their friend will simply install GNU/Linux over their computer and assure them that it will now run better.

This considered, advanced users mean alot for keeping a market share of a certain operating system. They are basically the anchor (or at least one of the anchors) of this market share. They are the ones who can make make a big difference. If they continue switching to GNU/Linux as they are, Windows market share is no longer so unbeatable.

So thank you Microsoft for annoying the light bearers of your market share away to GNU/Linux. You are really helping us! ;)

Now, it all reminds me of the futile battle RIAA and MPAA are leading against file sharing. What have these lawsuits and intimidation done is not so much the decrease of file sharing (as it has been steadily *increasing* despite their efforts), but the increased spite of the crowds against them, forming political pirate parties, releasing free movies and music, supporting the other side, a Free Culture readily waiting to expand on the expense of the old obsolete and inefficient world that RIAA and MPAA represent today.

What can we conclude from this? The more they are gripping their hands the more will slip from them! They are already loosing and they themselves end up being the ones accelerating their loss as they grip to save the future for themselves. The only thing keeping them up where they are, keeping their influence and power over those who can still be fooled, is the power they've accumulated in the past, not power they are accumulating in the present, because that is slipping away as people who've passed their propaganda, people who choose and think for themselves, are becoming their enemies.

The future? The future will be ours, not theirs. Free Software and Free Culture will prevail, simply because people like to be treated with respect, not as cash cows and criminals.

Thank you


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Comments

How true.... Microsoft is

How true.... Microsoft is getting more and more "evil", while free software, ever evolving, is getting more and more inviting to the Windows power user.
On another site I'm member on, ASEForums.com, there was some talk about Linux users a while back. There were a few people using gentoo/salckware... - call them true computer power users not bound­­­ strongly to specific software; most supporting regulars here at nuxified.org can IMHO be "filed" under that category. Most were probably using Windows (did not reply) - probably Windows power users or possibly newbies, and one had tried Mandrake Linux and did not find it satisfactory for the desktop. (but has it running on his server) - he could be considered a open-minded Windows power user; he tried.
Shortly after the release of Ubuntu Dapper, that same guy (incidently, the site owner) came out and shouted Ubuntu 6.06 is AWESOME and got a bit of following.
Incidents like this show when adoption has a chance of growing.

some good points

 

I switched to GNU/Linux for two reasons. One, I found it to be as powerful as Win2k/XP for a *much* better price (free). Secondly, I developed a conscience: I've never paid for a copy of Windows / MS Office / Roxio/Nero whatever, and yet I upgraded to the newest version (pirated, of course) whenever the opportunity presented itself. After a while, I just felt like a thief, and the equivalent tools in Linux were just as powerful and free.

The number of users who will be persuaded to upgrade to Linux because of the steep price tag of an MS operating system or Office Suite is minimal, because no one ever buys them---they come pre-installed on their brand new computers, and there is no incentive to switch except for philosophical reasons, which would never occur to the average user. You can make the virus / spyware argument to a potential convert, but I think that most Windows people are so afraid of switching that using a firewall and AV software and tolerating a few glitches now and then seems like a less painful alternative to them. To each his own, I guess...I found Linux and I'll never go back.

To say that Vista is alienating potential customers already is an eerily familiar statement. We all said the same thing when XP came out, how no one will upgrade and 'this is the moment for Linux.' We all know what happened there, e.g. nothing.

I'd love to be proved wrong, but I don't think the delay or the eventual release of Vista is going to change the status quo.

anonymous wrote: To say

anonymous wrote:

To say that Vista is alienating potential customers already is an eerily familiar statement. We all said the same thing when XP came out, how no one will upgrade and 'this is the moment for Linux.' We all know what happened there, e.g. nothing.

GNU/Linux has advanced tremendously in the past 5 years and I think it is in a much greater shape today to make a difference out of this opportunity. Not only that it has improved technically, but the number of corporations pushing it and adopting it has grown. Heck there's even alot of small companies who preinstall it and big vendors like Dell and HP are slowly picking it up as well. And then consider that while GNU/Linux has been improving in both usability, power and ease, Microsoft has become ever more rigorous with its anti-piracy measures and DRM. Public has grown much more weary of those things as well.

I'd say the situation is *much* different than it was back then and that makes this opportunity far more greater than the one in 2001.

My thoughts

 

My thoughts on this issue are as follows. I have been playing around with GNU/Linux for about eight years now. I started with the release of Redhat 7. It was a big learning jump for me back then and the product as I saw it on the Desktop was not ready for everyday use by a novice end-user.

Today alot has changed, I am now a big fan of Ubuntu Linux myself. I see their latest release Ubuntu 6.06 as being a distribution that I don't think a novice end-user would have a hard time getting used to if the system were pre-configured for them. I feel the same way about Suse 10.1 from Novell.

While a lot of big name Vendors are starting to offer Linux with their systems, I think we should not forget that the meaning of the words "with" and "on" are two different things. Lenovo for example ships their system with a blank hard drive and a copy of Suse Linux, however the end-user must install the operating systems themselves. A novice user would not want to try this on their own.

I think GNU/Linux would have an easier time taking on MS Windows if these Big name vendors would put a little more muscle behind the support they say they want to give to GNU/Linux. A pre-installed on the shelf/ out of the box GNU/Linux system would go a long way toward meeting this objective.

These vendors can stay out of the "proprietary" at the same time as long as the end-users can access a script that can handle the install of the "proprietary" items and a disclaimer is issued.

Just my two cents, your mileage may vary...

anonymous wrote: I think

anonymous wrote:

I think GNU/Linux would have an easier time taking on MS Windows if these Big name vendors would put a little more muscle behind the support they say they want to give to GNU/Linux. A pre-installed on the shelf/ out of the box GNU/Linux system would go a long way toward meeting this objective.

I fully agree with that. I've been making the same argument myself. That is probably the key to the desktop domination.

This article however was about a specific portion of the desktop market, power users who know how to install Windows and hence know the distinction between a computer and an OS and would then know how to install at least some GNU/Linux distros such as Ubuntu for example. While they may not be the whole key to the desktop market they are still important because they are the "computer guys" to alot of computer newbies surrounding them and seeking their help on everything that breaks. When they start switching to GNU/Linux, they will switch these computer newbie friends relying upon them as well.

The more local "computer guys" get annoyed by Windows into the free GNU/Linux world the more of other non power users will consequently switch. The more of those switch the bigger the pressure on major vendors to offer computers with pre-installed desktop GNU/Linux. And that's an ongoing process which is in-fact helped by the Microsoft's rigorous strategy. Hence my claim that they are shooting themselves in the foot and the assertion of that as at least one of the big reasons why Microsoft may be loosing to GNU/Linux, at least in the long term.

Ditto

 

Spot On Article

I persevered with cutting my dependencies on Windows after I had to phone them up one when I had exceeded some predefined limit os installations. I felt like a priate and in my opinion was made to feel like a priate. I PAYED THEM FOR THAT COPY and it was legit. It still annoys me I am glad that 95% of all my time is on Linux and has been for the last 4 years. I also have 3 other desktop computers and they run Linux as well as helping anyone and everyone I can to run linux.

Hard to switch

 

I've spent some time working on friends and family to switch from Windows and at the very least try a live CD of one distro or another. For the absolute novice in computers, it doesn't make a difference. I can say "this is how to send and check email", or "Use this to write a document" and the world is fine. I find it much harder to convice people of the possibilities if they are an intermediate level Windows user. They've used windows for a while (a few years at least) and have started to expect certain things from the computer because of it. It is these people who have a grasp of what's going on, but haven't opened up to further possibilities or different methods of doing the same task that look at GNU/Linux and say "well, it doesn't work the way I'm used to/the way Windows does it" and they get lost from there.

The other aspect that makes it hard for many people I know to switch, and a part I struggle with from time to time, is gaming. Until major games are released for GNU/Linux, it is my belief that the uptake of GNU/Linux on the desktop will be minimal and slow. I think every other aspect is there (personal opinion, of course).

 

"losing"

Seems like wishful thinking to me, but I wish you well.

If only!

 

Unfortunately, even "Power Users" (local "computer guys") that Danijel writes about are often locked in Windows, because, as the rule of thumb, they are professionaly bound to it by the tools (software) they have to use for their work. Although there are many Free tools which can compete with "professional" tools, at the end of the day they are either a little bit inferior, lacking some less significant function ("but what if I would need it?!"), to their proprietary counterparts, or a little "awkward to use" for those who used Windows applications since the begining of their careers and are acustomed to consistently similar UI these applications share. Some applications or eqivalents are simply missing from Free software: i.e. some free (but not Free) applications used for development of embedded systems, published by certain manufacturers of programmable electronic devices does not exist for any other platform then Windows and these devices are often used by hobbists, students and of course, professionals. It is sad that hardware hackers often can't use ultimate hacker's OS(s) for their work.

Second problem, in my own expirience with daily switching between Windows (2k) and GNU/Linux (Fedora) on a not quite new machine with not quite whole lot of RAM, I must admit that Windows and everyday applications on it (even Free Software for Windows, such as Firefox and Thunderbird) appears faster, which took me by surprise, as it was always one of the strong points: "the GNU/Linux performs better then Windows on an old machine, so you are not forced to jump thru a hoop ... again". Adding more RAM to a machine improved the situation for GNU/Linux, though. I suppose that nowadays people in rich countries find hardware upgrade not too cost-prohibitive, so the battle between GNU/Linux and Windows is fought on the middle to high end of the market. As I hear (but I don't have a first-hand expirience), the GNU/Linux outperforms Windows on a top-notch hardware. Having seen the list of hardware requirements for "Vista" I can only conclude that Microsoft is taking the gloves off for the "final" showdown. Up until now they probably kept their back-compatibility as wide as possible (probably they heard what I heard about GNU/Linux and old hardware), now they are preparing to fight for the top. I guess that leaves behind many Windows users who didn't plan to buy new computers soon, so will someone please think about us poor Eye ?

Nevertheless, freedom bears much more significance then the performance (or the price of the hardware...once you buy hardware it is yours...once you buy copy of and license for a proprietary software...well, duh). If an application is only as good as necessary, but Free, then it is already better then proprietary one with any bells or whistles. And that is a key point.

yes and no

 

I'm still not sure I agree. Yes, Linux has advanced a lot in five years. But back when XP came out, Linux had functional parity with Windows 2000, which was why everyone seemed so sure that people would flock to Linux. The argument seemed to be that they could have the same functionality of the system they were already used to, Win2k, for free. But it just didn't happen. The XP / Vista situation is exactly the same. Linux has parity with XP, and even some features in Vista---great graphics, a desktop search tool, a better browser/e-mail/word processor/etc., and people are using the same argument all over again that it's the tipping point for Linux. It's just not going to happen until every OEM offers pre-installed Linux alongside XP/Vista.

Quote: "losing" Seems like

Quote:

"losing"

Seems like wishful thinking to me, but I wish you well.

I always mess that one up. You're right, I should make it a rule to spellcheck everything. :S

Quote:

(...)
I guess that leaves behind many Windows users who didn't plan to buy new computers soon, so will someone please think about us poor Eye ?

You're right. And there already are certain GNU/Linux distributions which are aimed for lower end hardware. Fedora isn't really among them and I don't think Ubuntu counts as one as well. So at least in the GNU/Linux world there is choice even for those on older hardware. They just have to find the right distro. For Windows users it is a choice between sticking with the insecure and old Windows XP or buying a whole new high end machine with Vista, which is not an option for the poor.

Quote:

Unfortunately, even "Power Users" (local "computer guys") that Danijel writes about are often locked in Windows, because, as the rule of thumb, they are professionaly bound to it by the tools (software) they have to use for their work. Although there are many Free tools which can compete with "professional" tools, at the end of the day they are either a little bit inferior, lacking some less significant function ("but what if I would need it?!"), to their proprietary counterparts, or a little "awkward to use" for those who used Windows applications since the begining of their careers and are acustomed to consistently similar UI these applications share.

That stands. Change can be hard and that is why many people tend to avoid it, but when the benefit starts to outway the hardness of changing then these power users have enough incentive to consider GNU/Linux. In your last paragraph you have explained it all..

Quote:

Nevertheless, freedom bears much more significance then the performance (or the price of the hardware...once you buy hardware it is yours...once you buy copy of and license for a proprietary software...well, duh). If an application is only as good as necessary, but Free, then it is already better then proprietary one with any bells or whistles. And that is a key point.

Yes, exactly. Freedom is no longer so often percieved as a hippie feel good thing. An increasing number of people are now starting to see the difference between having freedom and not having it as those nightmare stories with Windows XP activation show, for one example. This is something that can get even the most hesitating power users decide to throw the cards on the table and switch, free themselves of all that Microsoft mess they've been put through.

re: yes and no

Quote:

It's just not going to happen until every OEM offers pre-installed Linux alongside XP/Vista.

You're right about that. But there is an additional reason today that wasn't as obvious in 2001. It is the increase of rigor on side of Microsoft and the DRM supportive features that are expected in Vista which also play a role because they make certain people actually feel the difference between free (as in freedom) and nonfree. The core point of my article is that. It is an additional reason for people who otherwise wouldn't switch, to switch.

And there already *is* an increasing trend of GNU/Linux being pre-installed on vendors computers too, which is I'm sure much greater than it was in 2001.

Now coming down to dry predictions I am not saying that in 2007 and beyond GNU/Linux would all of a sudden start to dominate or grow like incredible 10 or 20% market share per year. I understand it will take time. What I do predict, based on my observations, is that in the long term GNU/Linux indeed has a pretty good chance of dominating.

I wouldn't be surprised if by 2020 or so GNU/Linux hold more than 50% of the desktop market, hence becoming a dominate desktop OS. It is happening for many reasons described, and most reasons increasingly come down to people's ever more apparent desire for freedom of dependance on proprietary vendors.

Am I the only one who's fatigued...

 

... by all of these incessant "Can [Fill-in-Alternative-OS-Name-Here] take over the Desktop" threads? I understand that people are interested in promoting alternatives but, seriously, despite the OSS community's and Apple's best efforts, desktop market share hasn't changed significantly in recent years. There are many reasons for this...

1. First Mover Advantage - Microsoft has a huge entrenched base and is difficult to dislodge.

2. User Apathy - People don't buy operating systems. They buy packaged computers with OSes already installed. Unless and until Dell, IBM, and all of the major vendors promote and sell Linux desktop machines, consumers just won't care. And manufacturers have no incentive to make them care, as long as they're already selling a product that people buy.

3. Driver Support - Following on the heels of user apathy is lack of driver support. Yes, Linux and OSX support a wide variety of hardware, but not nearly as much hardware as Windows. Hardware OEMs/IHVs just don't make enough money on Linux and Apple currently to justify spending as many resources on Linux as they do on Windows. Can you blame them? If you were in their business, would you rather target 500 million Windows desktops -- or perhaps 15 million Macs or perhaps 8 million Linux boxes?

4. Software Availability - Sure, there's a bunch of free software available for 'nix, but the availability for Windows dwarfs these platforms. Games? Not many. Financial software? Not much. Not to mention the mountain of data that people have already accumulated on their Windows PCs. Who's going to pay to convert all of that data? Can it even BE converted? Some of the apps aren't even being sold anymore. This is a serious platform lock. People aren't inclined to upgrade all of their software and data investments simply because they can.

5. Training - It costs money for companies to retrain their employees and, despite the protestations that "it looks like Windows" and "even an idiot could run this", the TCO for running alternate platforms matches or exceeds Windows, based on my experience, so this begs the question: Why bother?

6. Cost - The initial purchase price of a desktop OS simply isn't a significant factor in its success or failure. Particularly since the cost of an OS is often incorporated into the cost of a new PC -- so, to many users, it appears to be "free", anyway.

Quote:Check this out:

What is your point? We aren't discussing the server market here anyway!

Quote:

... by all of these incessant "Can [Fill-in-Alternative-OS-Name-Here] take over the Desktop" threads? I understand that people are interested in promoting alternatives but, seriously, despite the OSS community's and Apple's best efforts, desktop market share hasn't changed significantly in recent years. There are many reasons for this...

Most of your reasons hold. Yes, that is why changes to the desktop market haven't been significant for a while, but that doesn't mean that the world stands still. As I pointed out earlier in this thread I am talking about the long term rather than short term and in the long term I believe things may change significantly. Things may not be changing fast, but they are changing and most of the reasons you named will eventually be addressed and eliminated and that is an ongoing process.

Quote:

Yes, Linux and OSX support a wide variety of hardware, but not nearly as much hardware as Windows.

Actually, Linux supports more hardware than any other platform, but it just unfortunately happens to lack support for certain popular devices which are often used which gives the impression that it supports less hardware. Why is this so? Not because of Linux itself, but because of vendors who refuse to release essential specifications needed for programmers to develop support.

However, as the mind and market share of GNU/Linux, however slowly, rises, this will be changing too. If you believe in status quo lasting forever you'll eventually be left behind.

Things change and will continue to change.

Be realistic

 

Linux will not be adopted until only 1 distro be for the desktop,
today the candidate is ubuntu is time to push it ...
but this not will happen, why?
"because every body want to rule the world" or in linux words:
"i want freedom to do what ever my fucking head think"
!! LINUX is not for common people that use PC !!

For linux success "volume of sales":
1) One desktop distro
.. this does not mean that the others distros die.
2) Vendors hardware support = consequence of #1
3) Applications for common people = commercial applications = consequence of #2
.. linux have certain advantage in #3 because:
- free applications to develop software
- communities of free programmers
- the development model "network" = internet

Linux is so far many years to be the desktop OS,
but microsoft is stuck.

Who will win the race? ? ?
I will bet to microsoft because their have the resources $$$$$$.

Xandros could easily replace XP in a business environment

 

Interesting that Xandros and Linspire are not mentioned - and who cares if the author misspelled a word. It is important to keep a discussion on track and not take cheap shots about a typo. Interesting how there are "camps" in regards to software. Some will fight to the death at any insult to their OS of choice. I feel myself getting sucked into it also at times but have to resist. Why do I not use Windows? Because I have no control over it. A window locks up and I have to sit there and wait like a chooch. I have to hit Control-Alt-Delete and kill the program. Because I have to reboot to fix problems. Because for some of us, we want more. What has Microsoft ever innovated? They bought DOS, stole Windows, borrowed NDS to make Active Directory, partned with Sybase to make SQL, partnered with IBM to get SMB and so on. Heck, even the little picture next to your login in XP was pirated from Mac. Microsoft Dynamics? I liked it the first time when it was Great Plains. The only thing Microsoft has contributed to the computing world is Clippie, that annoying helper in Microsoft Office.

Some of us see Windows users and lovers as ones who took the "blue" pill as lemmings that have no ability or desire to expand themselves and venture out beyond the "safe" boundries of Windows XP home with their AOL pre-installed from the factory.

I'm not nit-picking the author, but I think Xandros definetly rules the roost in the Desktop area. It gets a bad rap because Linux purists can run nmap on it out of the box. It's business capabilities are far superior to SLED 10 or any other Linux distro that I've used and I've tried just about all of them. Great article. I'd like to see Linux make headway for one reason - ISV will sit up and take notice and start making their software available for Linux.

Linux IS faster for slower hardware, but...

 

Only if it's a distribution designed for older, slower hardware. Try DSL or Slax, or Puppy Linux. Those are designed to run on very old hardware.

re: linux on older hardware

 
Quote:

I guess that leaves behind many Windows users who didn't plan to buy new computers soon, so will someone please think about us poor Eye?

I often encountered difficulties in early experiments with linux distros due to hardware limitations of the machines I had at my disposal. In particular lack of disk space was a problem during installs which attempted to dump huge numbers of packages into the hard-drive before the initial install was complete, leading to a hang in mid-install. The solution for me came with native Debian (3.0 or "Woody") which offered a two-stage install which uses minimal disk space for a simple command-line bootable OS, and from there you can choose the rest of the packages manually as space permits to build your system functionality (compiler, Xwindows, email, etc). This process would definitely be daunting for a newbie, but the final result was a smooth running Debian GNU/linux OS with graphical GUI interface using small-footprint window managers like blackbox or icewm. Very stable, and led me to learn the advantages of Debian-based systems in avoiding package dependency muddles.

By all accounts Ubuntu seems to be gaining converts & I'd like to try it myself; just waiting for the right machine ... Smiling

I took me a while but I learned

 

I have been in windows since the DOS days. I have just about every cert you could get for WIN2000 (MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDBA). Of course not to leave out the trusty A+ and NET+ from ComTia as well. I was a tried and true Windows perponent for years. I always looked at Linux as a waist of time or as a geeks closet hobby. Those days began to change when someone convienced me to load Red Hat 8 on an old system I wasn't using. At first I felt like a ghoat on rollerskates but, I found it challenging. That was the hook for me. I now only have 1 sytem in my house that is running windows (Because my wife has work software on it) and in the future I truly hope to be windows free. I do have found that GNU/Linux has come along way and I believe that if it continues on this course it will be a force to recon with in the future. I am currently running Ubuntu 6.06 and find it simply wonderful. It has everything that any end user would need to be productive professionally and personally. That being said, I must admit that until the major PC manufacturers box Linux with their new systems, it is going to be very difficult to grab a large portion of the MS market share.

I did find it interesting about the super user comment. There is a lot of truth to that. I often try to get people that I know to use Linux, if its a linux program that has been made available to Windows (i.e. forefox, audacity, NVu, etc). Often when they see how user friendly these programs are, they become interested (kinda like setting out the bait and waiting to set the hook).

I know personally for me, I wanted something more from my system and thats what GNU/Linux provides. You can do what ever you want to it so that it becomes yours. Windows will aways belong to Bill.

SLED 10 appeals

 

As a long time Linux fan, I try out every new distro as it comes along, trying to find one that will persuade my Windows centric friends to at least, dual boot.

I duly went to the SLED 10 launch, got my free copies and a nice SUSE mascot, and trotted off home to try out all those "yew bute" features.

The XGL/Compiz interface is a real arm twister for Windows users. It gets them multiple full screen virtual desktops at the scroll of the mouse. They want to show that off to their own Windows friends.

A demo of Beagle in one desktop and here is a mini picture of that file they lost because they couldn't remember its name.
Plug in the iPod in another desktop, and burn a new CD of the current library, just like a bought one.
Plug in that digital camera and F-Spot downloads and reviews all the pictures on another full screen desktop.
Install Skype and lets talk to our friends while the iPod is playing.
Scroll to another blank screen and use the latest Firefox to do some browsing.

But can I still play my Windows games? Yeh, I'll just load it up dual boot and you can explore the Cedega page.
Can I do my Office work? Here, try that xls spreadsheet with the embedded macros in Open Office.

SLED 10 is so good, I've dual booted 10 of my former Windows only friends, and installed CrossOver to migrate another 3.

The more that migrate, the more pressure there will be on application vendors to ship a Linux port. So even if you don't like SLED, it's the current one with the power to make Windows users try something different.

I happen to like linux..but..

 

The unfortunate truth, is that there are a lot of instances where linux is not well suited as the operating system of choice for many users, especially the technically inept. Some of my hardware is not supported via linux (except with experimental drivers, that sometimes cause unwanted side effects, that usually have to be compiled in to work). Many potential users have a hard time installing hardware and drivers in Windows, which is honestly, easier to install drivers on. Some software packages are only available for Windows, and/or MacOS platforms (especially in the high end audio/video industry). So, in most cases, they wouldn't get as much use out of Linux. Don't get me wrong. I've used, and enjoyed Redhat, Fedora Core (2, 3 and 4), and I have used many of the smaller debian and redhat offshoots. I'm by no means a Linux expert, and the whole operating system is vastly improved over how it was back when I installed Slackware 2. And, I firmly believe in opensource projects, but until more of the 'commercial' developers take an interest in alternative operating systems, I realize that a lot of people will not switch...solely because Microsoft software is currently running on so many systems, and they are afraid to try something that they may not understand. Linux has a bad stigma of being overly complex to begin with. I'd love to get away from microsoft software altogether, but at the moment, it's unrealistic. Maybe in the near future ReactOS will become more stable, and we will have an alternative to Windows, with which we can run our windows software and utilities to maintain our compatibility, and run Linux for the rest of our home and business computing needs..in the meantime, unfortunately, the market won't shift far enough to make microsoft even take notice of how people feel...(or, if they do know how people feel, I doubt it will make them care any more about those people).

Quote: I know personally

Quote:

I know personally for me, I wanted something more from my system and thats what GNU/Linux provides. You can do what ever you want to it so that it becomes yours. Windows will aways belong to Bill.

Well said! Smiling

Quote:

I know personally for me, I wanted something more from my system and thats what GNU/Linux provides. You can do what ever you want to it so that it becomes yours. Windows will aways belong to Bill.
(...)

You know, your comment comes as kind of arbitrary after reading the one prior to yours (about SLED appeal). Eye Things are not perfect, that's for sure. Some devices don't work because the manufacturer wont play along (that's the case 99% of times when there are no satisfactory drivers) and some proprietary applications don't work (which IMO is not a problem at all because proprietary software only subverts freedom). So, I'd just say maybe you could give it another chance. Evaluate your needs and then see what is really missing for *you* to be satisfied with it. Sure some applications you're used to don't run on GNU/Linux, but there are pretty good equivalent alternatives to consider!

Also, GNU/Linux is moving and improving very fast. If you tried it only few months ago chances are that many issues you've had are now resolved and many things improved. As a GNU/Linux user I experience these changes quite frequently. Have you tried the latest Ubuntu or SLED?

Cheers
Danijel

not so easy

 

I love linux! But I can not leave windows xp, before I can play so many computer games well in linux, such as Neverwinter Night, Warcraft III....

Neverwinter runs on Linux

 

Neverwinter Nights is a bad example, since this is one of the few games which can run on Linux natively.

HappyPenguin.org

You can try wine and cedega for games that aren't running natively on GNU/Linux if you must have them, but there are some great Free GNU/Linux native games to consider! Just check out HappyPenguin.org.

Cheers

This is the year, AGAIN

 

Every year is the year. Let's see Windows has 95% of the market. Somehow the word "Loosing" sounds like "The more you spend the more you save" marketing scheme.

libervisco didn't actually

libervisco didn't actually say that this is the year Eye

Hehe, do I need to quote

Hehe, do I need to quote myself again? Eye

I said this:

<?php
if ($year_linux_desktop == "year when GNU/Linux has finally started its steady encroachment to the desktop")
   print
"2006 is the year";
else
{
  print
"You may have a different definition and according to your definition of the YEAR, 2006 may not be it";
  return
"YMMV";
}
?>

Maybe that will be better understood! Eye

Thank you

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