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New "switch to Linux" section: help wanted

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ariadacapo's picture
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Joined: 2006-07-13

Hi everyone,

I have re-worked the "switch to Linux" section. It is almost finished.

The temporary part is online for all to comment on / criticize. It is a temporary adress which is kept out of indexing robots:

http://www.getgnulinux.org/switch_to_linux_2

All links in the website are "relative", which should ease the transition.

Here are the main changes:

  • "get it" page split
    I split the page into "Choose a distribution" + "Try and install". Therefore we have more space and the structure is clearer (not one page trying to do all at once).
    The distro-choose page is not complete. In particular, I am working on the screenshots which are all temporary and should be ready within 24hrs.
    Also, I'd like to point to a lightweight distribution (that can run on old computers). Any recommendations?
  • .

  • New "Where to go" page
    A set of good links, for which I need your help. Consider a newbie who has just installed, or is just to about to install, Ubuntu or OpenSUSE. Where would you point him/her to? Which resources are most useful to help him/her technically without drowning them?
  • .

  • "Free Windows" page removed
    Deleted the page, which is not so relevant to the website. I hope to replace it with a "most useful Linux apps" page in the future. Right now, the page was in the way.

I hope to read your comments and contributions, so that hopefully, we can put the new part up in a couple of days. After that, I hope the main big addition change to be some kind of Wiki so we can work on translations / community work more efficiently.

Cheers!

Olivier.

michuk's picture
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Joined: 2006-08-20
polishlinux? :)
ariadacapo wrote:

New "Where to go" page
A set of good links, for which I need your help. Consider a newbie who has just installed, or is just to about to install, Ubuntu or OpenSUSE. Where would you point him/her to? Which resources are most useful to help him/her technically without drowning them?

I hope PolishLinux.org (sections: Installation, First steps and Apps) can be a good place to point to.

libervisco's picture
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Ariadacapo wrote: Also, I'd
Ariadacapo wrote:

Also, I'd like to point to a lightweight distribution (that can run on old computers). Any recommendations?

For more experienced users Arch, Slackware or Zenwalk may be the best. For new users there is Vector and possibly Frugalware or even Xubuntu (since it uses more lightweight Xfce desktop environment).

Debian may qualify there somewhere as well.

That's the thing with many of the distros for advanced users. They really tend to offer you a choice of making it as bloated or as lightweight as possible. In my cases it depends on you if it'll run on older hardware or not. Such is the case with Arch for example where "default" is pretty insignificant.

Quote:

A set of good links, for which I need your help. Consider a newbie who has just installed, or is just to about to install, Ubuntu or OpenSUSE. Where would you point him/her to? Which resources are most useful to help him/her technically without drowning them?

Well one possibility for Ubuntu users is definitely the UbuntuGuide.org. Some other cool places to link to are the FSF Free Software Directory and LinuxAppFinder.org which help find good programs and applications a new user may need after installation, at least to get the names to search for with synaptic. Eye

libervisco's picture
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Michuk wrote: I hope
Michuk wrote:

I hope PolishLinux.org (sections: Installation, First steps and Apps) can be a good place to point to.

Yes indeed. I agree. Smiling

michuk's picture
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some more ideas
libervisco wrote:
Ariadacapo wrote:

Also, I'd like to point to a lightweight distribution (that can run on old computers). Any recommendations?

For more experienced users Arch, Slackware or Zenwalk may be the best. For new users there is Vector and possibly Frugalware or even Xubuntu (since it uses more lightweight Xfce desktop environment).

I think Arch, Debian and Gentoo are the most approrate ones. Also, a link to distro feature comparison (http://polishlinux.org/choose/comparison/) could be on place, so that more demanding users could select a distro by themselves (or even go BSD).

free-zombie's picture
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Frugalware is more like

Frugalware is more like Debian/Arch here...

Pretty much any distribution for more advanced users can be used to build a lightweight system. Vector and Xubuntu (not so light...) are geared further towards new users with slower systems.

libervisco's picture
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advanced users distros
free-zombie wrote:

Pretty much any distribution for more advanced users can be used to build a lightweight system.

Yes, and same goes for more than just building a lightweight system. With a distro for advanced users you can probably build an all Free Software system too even if the distribution doesn't official advertise itself as all Free. For example, on Arch, I decide what I will have installed and whatnot, so despite that flash or java and stuff like that are available in a repo without any distinction I just don't install it.

tbuitenh's picture
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gentoo on old computers?
michuk wrote:
libervisco wrote:
Ariadacapo wrote:

Also, I'd like to point to a lightweight distribution (that can run on old computers). Any recommendations?

For more experienced users Arch, Slackware or Zenwalk may be the best. For new users there is Vector and possibly Frugalware or even Xubuntu (since it uses more lightweight Xfce desktop environment).

I think Arch, Debian and Gentoo are the most approrate ones. Also, a link to distro feature comparison (http://polishlinux.org/choose/comparison/) could be on place, so that more demanding users could select a distro by themselves (or even go BSD).

I don't think gentoo is appropriate for an old computer. All the compiling would take ages :zzz:

dylunio's picture
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tbuitenh wrote: I don't
"tbuitenh" wrote:

I don't think gentoo is appropriate for an old computer . All the compiling would take ages :zzz:

It depends what you mean by 'old' and what the usage is, I run a 8 year old PII with Gentoo as my webserver. The compiling can take ages (with something like gcc) but it's a server thus on all the time so it doesn't matter that much, but I wouldn't really reconmend an old desktop computer with Gentoo.

(I'll admit it did take me 5 days to install via the Jackass! installation of Gentoo on the machine!)

dylunio

AndrewB's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-18
If you had a few old

If you had a few old computers with gentoo, or even just a few old computers running GNU/Linux or BSD you could set up DistCC

tbuitenh's picture
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I think most people who just

I think most people who just switched from windows want a desktop system and are not ready to play with distcc.

ariadacapo's picture
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Joined: 2006-07-13
Thanks very much for the

Thanks very much for the comments everyone.

For the helpful resource links:

I am adding the ubuntuguide.org and polishlinux.org links straight away. Excellent material:)

[Michuk, this is a great site by the way! I have kept out of the jakilinux/polishlinux introduction because of extremely little time right now, but this is great news. And I have finally found out who was sending all this traffic to and using button bandwith of getgnulinux! = ) ]

I am not so convinced by the Linuxappfinder, in which I found quite a lot of proprietary software and which doesn't seem to say too much about it. And I find the FSF directory a bit frugal (as most FSF webpages). What do you think? I will put them up if there is strong consensus about that.

About the lightweight distribution:
I propose to stick to Arch, which I chose rather arbitrarily amongst your good proposals. I think the point here is not to find the ultimate light distro, but just to pick one if ever a beginner only has an old PC.
The main idea behind the particular "various distros" paragraph is to avoid someone giving Gnu/Linux because "it's too heavyweight" or "too simple" or "too graphical" and so on. Just to show concrete examples of the richness and diversity of Linux.

So, three things to do before online:
- I am finishing the printscreens at the moment;
- I think with these additional links in the "Where to go" page make it good enough to start with;
- Some inevitable code-checking, link-proofing, browser testing etc
Given my little time, I estimate this to be done in the coming 24 to 48 hrs.

Cheers!

Olivier.

libervisco's picture
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ariadacapo wrote:I am not
ariadacapo wrote:

I am not so convinced by the Linuxappfinder, in which I found quite a lot of proprietary software and which doesn't seem to say too much about it. And I find the FSF directory a bit frugal (as most FSF webpages). What do you think? I will put them up if there is strong consensus about that.

Oh I didn't browse through it much yet. I think the founder of the site posted a bit here so maybe if he sees this he could take a few hints. Eye

ariadacapo wrote:

And I find the FSF directory a bit frugal (as most FSF webpages). What do you think? I will put them up if there is strong consensus about that.

You mean ugly? Well it's getting alot better lately. FSF site has been looking pretty good for a while now and GNU has a new homepage since recently and a friendlier font for the rest of the site. The design of the directory could be a bit improved though, but it is still one of the best, if not the best Free Software directories around. It helped me a few times too. It doesn't list only applications though so.. I don't know.. maybe the idea of starting an applications directory of our own here on Nuxified.org could be reconsidered afterall..

Or we could work with LinuxAppFinder.org to improve it..

ariadacapo wrote:

I propose to stick to Arch, which I chose rather arbitrarily amongst your good proposals. I think the point here is not to find the ultimate light distro, but just to pick one if ever a beginner only has an old PC.

For me, Arch is great, but I'm something you might call an "advanced GNU/Linux user". Arch is not only lightweight, but meant for at least intermediate GNU/Linux users and hardly new users. If you recommend it, that should probably be stated: that there is a learning curve involved.

ariadacapo's picture
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Alright! After a lot of

Alright!

After a lot of effort, I finished the renewal of the Switch to Linux section. It's now fully up:

http://www.getgnulinux.org/switch_to_linux/

If you could please visit the Choose a distribution, Try and Install, Where to go now and What Linux looks like pages with a critical and suspicious eye, I would be grateful Smiling Then please post your comments here so we can improve.

libervisco wrote:

Arch is not only lightweight, but meant for at least intermediate GNU/Linux users and hardly new users.

I certainly believe you - I haven't tried it myself. If this isn't appropriate, let's choose another: but please, everyone only recommend one choice so we quickly settle on something. Here the key things for the distro are lightweight and easy.

Thanks! I'm glad this job is done.

Olivier

libervisco's picture
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Looks great! I love what

Looks great! I love what GetGNULinux.org is becoming. There's no other site like that, very cool. Smiling

The three of our projects, GetGNULinux.org, PolishLinux.org and Nuxified.org are forming a quite powerful trio for promoting Free Software to the world. We just need to get alot more people know about us, read our sites and use our services. Smiling

I don't have any major complaints for the new section. It looks pretty good. Smiling

ariadacapo's picture
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the trio
libervisco wrote:

Looks great! I love what GetGNULinux.org is becoming. There's no other site like that, very cool. Smiling

I'm glad you like the website as much as I do. I really hope to build a first-class website that looks like it's been built by pros. I hope to come close to that in the coming months.

libervisco wrote:

The three of our projects, GetGNULinux.org, PolishLinux.org and Nuxified.org are forming a quite powerful trio for promoting Free Software to the world. We just need to get alot more people know about us, read our sites and use our services. Smiling

You are right, this is increasingly looking like a productive arrangement. Hopefully with some work on both GetGnuLinux.org and PolishLinux.org, we can improve still. I will look more into this now.
All in all I am really enthusiastic about what is coming up.