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How to transfer files from winxp to ubuntu through network

10 replies [Last post]
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Joined: 2006-11-20

I am getting a crash course in computing and networking.

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
I'm unfortunately not the

I'm unfortunately not the best to answer this question, but I can at least give you a hint from all that I know; you use Samba for connecting GNU/Linux and Windows PCs in a local network. Once that is properly set up (others may help you with the details on that), most popular file managers like konqueror and nautilus can browse the remote Windows system via "SMB" protocol (smb://) which is how you can also transfer files back and forth.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
WinSCP or Samba

Use WinSCP. Here is a tutorial to help you with what to do on your PC, but instead of using OpenSSH to generate the keys, use PuTTY Gen so the key will be compatible with WinSCP. The textbox at the top of PuTTY Gen is what you copy into ~/.ssh/authorized_keys on your PC.

Or use Samba as libervisco described above.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
I'm like a huge expert

I'm like a huge expert here. My Windows and Linux net skills are deep. What exactly are you trying to do? Build a batch job that moves files, do a one-off transfer, or permit a way in the GNOME or KDE GUI to be able to regularly access those files? Is this workstation in a domain or just a home network? Let me know and I'll see if I can come up with the best answer that I think will work for you.

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Joined: 2006-11-20
Alright this is what i am trying to do

What exactly are you trying to do?

I want to access to my winxp files through a home network. I have to move photos, documents and i want to do it with using swappable media.

Possibly sync and update those files, when a new version is detected. But not urgent, yet.

I would like to be able to move files from ubuntu to winxp and vice versa without hiccups.

I would also like to enable remote desktop ,is this safe and a better soultion, on both machines.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
Samba

Oh, I thought you wanted to transfer files between home and school/work. Within home, Samba would probably be the best.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
Samba

Sorry it's taken me so long to get back to this. I've been swamped.

I want to access to my winxp files through a home network. I have to move photos, documents and i want to do it with using swappable media.

$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install smbfs
$ mkdir /mnt/winxp
$ mount -t smbfs username=USER,password=PASS,workgroup=DOMAIN,rw //WORKSTATION/SHARE /mnt/winxp

At this point, you can reach /mnt/winxp in Nautilus or your favorite file manager and read/write to it. There's also an fstab way to do this but I don't have my notes handy on that at this moment. With the /etc/fstab technique, you can have this thing automatically mount on reboot without you having to run command line item 4 (above) again.

Note above that DOMAIN should either be the DOMAIN if your XP is in a Windows domain environment, or simply put the workstation's name. As for user/pass, you can either use the one you use to login to your workstation, or you can create a new one and give it power user rights by going to XP and doing Start, Run, lusrmgr.msc, adding a new account, and sticking it in the Power User or Admins group.

The ',rw' is very important because without that you end up with a read-only connection.

Note above that you share a folder on Windows by right-clicking it and choosing Share. However, there are some things called "Hidden Shares" for each of your drives and you can reach them by using a dollar sign, like referring to them as such from Linux:

'//workstation/c$'

Also, your workstation name probably won't translate on your Linux workstation, so you have to edit your HOSTS file like so:

$ sudo nano /etc/hosts

and you put an entry at the bottom like:

10.10.10.230 myworkstation

replacing it with your IP address of that workstation and its name.

Note at my house, my XP workstation comes up by default on XP with DHCP. Therefore, I played with my router/firewall and switch it such that my workstations each have a static IP address. I then configure each system with a static IP address. By doing this, my workstation will always be known by the Linux system always on the same address in my /etc/hosts file, never changing.

(Actually, I used to have an XP workstation until lightning hit it and I took it offline. Now my house runs nothing but Ubuntu on all the family home computers.)

Possibly sync and update those files, when a new version is detected. But not urgent, yet.

Synchronization is a good bit tougher. Create a batch file in Bash that copies files over. You can look at 'man cp' to see what switches you need to not overwrite a file unless it is newer, or, if you know Bash pretty well, you can also 'stat' the file, parse, grep, and cut on the info that's returned, and use an if/then logic to determine if the file should be copied over -- although that's super complex.

I would like to be able to move files from ubuntu to winxp and vice versa without hiccups.

Yep, once the mount is created,

I would also like to enable remote desktop ,is this safe and a better solution, on both machines.

Sure, remote desktop is completely safe if you're behind a decent firewall. At my office, we have a Cisco PIX firewall, so I'm secure. At home, I also have a hardware-based DSL/Cable Modem and a separate DSL/Cable firewall/router box (from USR). Many DSL/Cable modems come with web interfaces to them that you can reconfigure so that you don't even need a separate firewall/router box.

I also recommend that you change the local administrator password on your XP workstation, as well as all the passwords for non-service accounts you see in lusrmgr.msc, to really tough passwords like #d3389dY/Y or something like that.

Then, you can use Remote Desktop in Ubuntu (or a combination of tsclient and rdesktop, or simply rdesktop, commands) to connect over Windows Terminal Services to your XP workstation.

Some other notes about Windows:

* You need to enable Remote Desktop by right-clicking My Computer, choosing Properties, choosing Remote tab, and enabling it.
* You need to start the Terminal Services service if it's not started, and set it to Automatic.
* Remote Desktop only works with XP Pro and up, not XP Home. Otherwise, you need to install VNC on it and connect with Remote Desktop using the VNC option. Note that VNC is far slower than the very efficient RDP protocol of Terminal Services.
* The jargon used for connecting to Windows like this is called "TS'ing into Windows". It stands for Terminal Services.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
just Samba
supermike wrote:

Possibly sync and update those files, when a new version is detected. But not urgent, yet.

Synchronization is a good bit tougher. Create a batch file in Bash that copies files over. You can look at 'man cp' to see what switches you need to not overwrite a file unless it is newer, or, if you know Bash pretty well, you can also 'stat' the file, parse, grep, and cut on the info that's returned, and use an if/then logic to determine if the file should be copied over -- although that's super complex.

Why not just put everything that would be synced on the Samba share?

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08
speaking of non-available

speaking of non-available domain names: I had a look at that problem recently and wrote about two solutions.

AndrewB's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-18
As apposed to Samba, you

As apposed to Samba, you could also set up NFS.
NFS can be nnative on windows, if you go and get UNIX services for windows.
As for setting it up.. I don't know. I never have set it up yet.

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Joined: 2006-11-20
thanks very detailed

im going with samba for now, and then play with the others later.

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