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Removing LinDVD and Cedega

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Gustavo's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-11

Hi, everyone.

One one hand, we encourage people not to use Windows because it's a Freedom-depriving software, but on the other hand we say "to legally play DVDs you may install LinDVD" and "to play some Windows games, you may install Cedega"... While LinDVD and Cedega are both freedom-depriving software, just like Windows.

If I was a visitor of GGL, I'd think "these guys don't really care about freedom, but only about getting Linux users".

It makes no sense to spread the word about freedom in computing while letting people know that they can play their freedom-depriving DVDs and games with freedom-depriving software. So, I suggest we don't mention LinDVD nor Cedega.

Cheers!

Gustavo's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-11
Another option is to say

Another option is to say that both LinDVD and Cedega are non-free software too, just like Windows. If we go for this option, we should also encourage them not to use those applications.

ariadacapo's picture
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Joined: 2006-07-13
That's really a difficult

That's really a difficult matter.

For one, Cedega will be used by users as a way to play Windows games without Windows. My experience is that gamers are rarely ready to give up their favorite games for a new (liberating) OS (or for anything for that matter:-)). Cedega will never be a real incentive for people to use privative software. Instead, it makes the transition less painful. So, while it's privative, it also reduces the amount of restrictions on users (who "can" then get rid of Windows).
I suggest we simply mention that Cedega is proprietary but keep the link there.

Second, the DVD. I really can't envision any future for GNU/Linux pre-loaded computers without legal DVD playback. This is a legal, or more precisely, political problem. I don't think we're in a position to encourage people to break these (totally outrageous) laws. In contrast, it's just not enough to stay mute on the subject. Until these DMCA and such laws are changed (my understanding is that only France and the USA have them), no free software will ever be able to do DVD legally.
Our problem here is that there seems to be no legal solution whatsoever for GNU/Linux in these countries. This link to LinDVD is dead and I can find no trace of that program anywhere now. So really I don't know what to do about it. Does anyone have any more info?

tbuitenh's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-21
I think the mention of

I think the mention of cedega and lindvd being privative software should contain a link to a separate page explaining why using a few privative programs is less bad than running a privative operating system (eg from a security ( = privacy = freedom) perspective an app runs with less permissions than a kernel; from a more usual freedom perspective one can say "the less, the better", ...). Readers don't have to be converted into freedom "radicals" as ourselves, but they should receive a good explanation so they can learn how to be as free as possible without losing anything also in situations with other software we didn't even think about.

Gustavo's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-11
I like that idea.

I like that idea.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
seconded

I think this is the attitude we should have. It's unrealistic to think we'll get everyone to give up all nonfree software.

ariadacapo's picture
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Joined: 2006-07-13
This is interesting and

This is interesting and there could maybe be parallels with Gustavo's ideas for "unrestrained.info".
In the meantime, is someone willing to write such a text?
I am reluctant to add a page to GGL, would an FAQ entry in the "Linux FAQ" be suitable?

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08
ariadacapo wrote: (my
ariadacapo wrote:

(my understanding is that only France and the USA have them)

optimist.

German copyright law isn't any better in this respect, and I could imagine that more EU countries, if not all, have restrictions like these. I know Australia has some patent treaties with the US, maybe the DMCA has grown down under as well.

Gustavo's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-11
I can write it, but I

I can write it, but I honestly don't know where to put such a text.

I think we can do this:

1.- LinDVD: When we talk abut LinDVD, we might suggest they purchase LinDVD just to pay for the royalties, but encourage them to use free software to play their DVDs.

2.- Cedega: When we mention Cedega, we may use what tbuitenh suggested (inside that faq).

What do you think?

Whistler's picture
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Joined: 2006-01-03
I think that's a

I think that's a requirement of the WIPO (World "Intellectual Property" Organization) and even China also has a DMCA-like copyright law since 2001.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
I don't think that works.

1: IANAL, but let's play it safe in case that isn't how the licenses work. So don't suggest that.

2: Good.

Gustavo's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-11
Hi! This is my try. What do

Hi!

This is my try.

What do you think?

Cheers!

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
Sounds good to me. Maybe

Sounds good to me. Maybe the "useless constraints" at the end of the first text could be changed to "unnecessary constraints" or "unnecessary restrictions".

Gustavo's picture
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Joined: 2006-09-11
Thank you, libervisco! It's

Thank you, libervisco!

It's now corrected.

Cheers!

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