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set up a website with old computer or laptop

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Joined: 2006-11-20

how do I do this? I want to be able to setup a website to host some things for myself. I am not sure for what yet. How should i start? I cant script and i want it to be user friendly. Drag and drop or something simple.

Oh are there assignments or practice these ideas.

tbuitenh's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-21
If you're lucky it can be

If you're lucky it can be this simple (depends on the distribution):

install lighttpd or apache
put some html files in /home/you/public_html/
reboot (or don't reboot but start the http daemon in the more difficult way)
point your browser at http://localhost/~you/

Next you will need to connect the thing to the net and have a domain name point at it, but see if you can manage this first.

Note that especially default apache configurations shipped by distributions have a reputation of being totally insecure. Also note that you may end up paying a lot to your ISP because of people visiting the server. Finally, note that some ISPs will block your connection if they detect you're running a website from home.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
tutorial

Tutorial (which I should polish and publish here)

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08
Unstable never was, is not

Unstable never was, is not and never will be etch. Unstable is always sid.

Also, you could mention that in debian the file is /etc/apache2/apache2.conf, NOT httpd.conf (though that exists and is included, so could probably be used...

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
Debian names
free-zombie wrote:

Unstable never was, is not and never will be etch. Unstable is always sid.

Fixed.

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Joined: 2005-12-20
You can use something like

You can use something like httpd (which was already said), you would also need a domain name, you can get free dynamic ones from www.dyndns.org , this will let you be able to view the site from the web.

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Joined: 2007-04-10
fr0zenmon wrote: how do I
fr0zenmon wrote:

how do I do this? I want to be able to setup a website to host some things for myself. I am not sure for what yet. How should i start? I cant script and i want it to be user friendly. Drag and drop or something simple.

Oh are there assignments or practice these ideas.

If it's an old PC, Xubuntu might be a good idea. After setting-up Xubuntu, you'll need Apache, MySQL, and PHP to make a web server. All can be installed directly from the repositories.

tbuitenh's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-21
XUbuntu? Why?
10cents wrote:

If it's an old PC, Xubuntu might be a good idea. After setting-up Xubuntu, you'll need Apache, MySQL, and PHP to make a web server. All can be installed directly from the repositories.

I would advise against using a desktop distro. Why wait for X and desktop software upgrades at every update if you're not going to use that software anyway? Also, making sure X won't be started at boot (why use precious cpu cycles and memory for it?) is just an extra annoyance.
Note ubuntu can also be installed without GUI.

MySQL and PHP are not absolutely necessary for a web server unless you want to install a PHP-based CMS (such as drupal). So apt-get install apache would do the trick.

My own webserver (which doubles as my desktop/laptop and is only for testing my own programs) runs archlinux + lighttpd + python + SQLite (latter two are needed for my programs).

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
Well, using something like

Well, using something like Xubuntu may make some sense to some people who are just starting out trying to run a home server for something. In that case certain GUI or web front ends (like webmin or mysql-admin) may be desirable, so in that case a light GUI wouldn't be such a bad thing, but for a real well performing web server GUI should be off..

tbuitenh's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-21
Web front ends are nice,

Web front ends are nice, especially because they can be used from another computer. I think the original poster has multiple computers... if not, he doesn't need to install XUbuntu, he could use whatever distribution he is currently using.

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Joined: 2006-03-28
As far as I've seen EnGarde

As far as I've seen EnGarde Secure Linux, which is designed for secure servers, brings some web-interface for all the stuff you need to set-up. At least I guess it's for everything since it seems that by default no local login seems to be possible at all.
Will have to have another look into it.

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Joined: 2007-04-10
Xubuntu
libervisco wrote:

Well, using something like Xubuntu may make some sense to some people who are just starting out trying to run a home server for something.

Laughing out loud

It made sense to me when I set-up a file server. Pardon us newbs but a "headless" computer was an alien idea. Although IPcop has forced me to deal with web-based interface. Anyways, the original poster was looking for a point and click solution, I think.

I got a question. If I set-up a GUI like Xubuntu in my server, can I still access the server's functions from other computers via browsers? Or do I need to use a GNU/Linux server distro, like the one that comes with Ubuntu text installers.

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
server's aren't so special
10cents wrote:

If I set-up a GUI like Xubuntu in my server, can I still access the server's functions from other computers via browsers?

Yes; putting a GUI on it just means putting a GUI on it. If it's serving stuff the only effect could possibly be slightly slower serving due to resources being used for the GUI. Although you could install a GUI and only run it when you need to but not constantly (this is what I do on my server with XFCE).

10cents wrote:

do I need to use a GNU/Linux server distro, like the one that comes with Ubuntu text installers.

See here.

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Joined: 2007-04-10
Thanks.

Thanks.

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Joined: 2007-04-14
I tried setting up a

I tried setting up a website with my laptop last year but I didn't succeed quickly enough so I gave up...the only difference was that I was using Apache on Windows...although I really don't see it making a big difference...I might try again though.

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08
I do see it making a

I do see it making a difference: apt-get install apache2 on debian or ubuntu and it works. You have a web server running that takes data from /var/www/. Install php5 (or whatever, a synaptic search should help), and that apache2 supports PHP. On Windows, you're on your own - configuration isn't remotely taken care of.

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