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What do you or don't you like about Ubuntu the most?

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libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04

Welcome aboard Mark.

You have a good point about GNOME there. Frankly, I think that replacing that path bar in nautilus with plain buttons may have not been the best decision either. To an extend I'd say I liked it, but it is still much more powerful when you are able to write the path in yourself instead of being confined to buttons.. Even windows doesn't put buttons there..

That said, GNOME does seem to be friendlier in some areas so there's something good about their approach, but I think KDE doesn't lack much in that area either.

I don't really have a favourite. I use Xfce with nautilus desktop at the moment and I tend to switch between WM's as it suits me.. Smiling

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Joined: 2006-01-29

I have been considered a GNOME fanboy by some, so I guess my opinion should be taken in that context. However, I would agree that *requiring* configuration of a screensaver would be an inherantly bad design. I think the devloper's first response was meant that he was taking the original post the same way.

Now, allowing configuration is fine and should be an option. Then again, it's just a screensaver; really it should only be active when no one is even using the computer. Personally,I just set mine to blank or power off instead of activating a new app that requires more power to be consumed, and more heat to be generated.

That being said, I do agree that some of the GNOME configuration options have been either removed or hidden so much as to make them unusable. The dev team definitely needs to reapproach some of these situations. But, the only non-default setting I use is to turn off spatial Nautilus (the one thing I would love to see killed off).

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
"dotmil" wrote:

I have been considered a GNOME fanboy by some, so I guess my opinion should be taken in that context. However, I would agree that *requiring* configuration of a screensaver would be an inherantly bad design.

I missed that word *require* actually. I would agree then. If you have user friendliness as a goal then indeed if a screensaver program wont work properly unless you take an effort of configuring it in a certain way it may be a bit too much too ask a new user considering it's just a screensaver which is supposed to work as such by default.

So yes, if it requires configuration to work, it can be considered a bad design.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
"klepas" wrote:
"dylunio" wrote:

I like the clean integration with GNOME, and it's very polished feel.
The one thing I hate about it (yes hate not dislike) it apt-get. Apt realy freaks me out, it somehow installs 203 updates in 5 minuts *shudder* and the fact you type something like sudo apt-get install foo and it'll give an error message until you put in realy weird fuller name like apt-get install foo-bar-baz-123-marisha.

I think I'd like ubuntu better if it had portage, and mybe pacman (though I've never tried pacmen).

And then it wouldn't be Debian based.

Try:

apt-cache search foo | grep -i "foo" | more

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
"dylunio" wrote:
"tbuitenh" wrote:

Hey, that would be cool, a package manager that works like this:

# packagegod I need a browser
A web browser, a file browser or an image browser?
> a web browser
The following are available:
(1) firefox (recommended)
(2) epiphany (recommended because you have gnome)
(3) konqueror (for KDE)
(4) dillo (lightweight)
> 1
Installing firefox... done.
Thank you for using packagegod.

But considering the amount of free software that exists, something like that would be very difficult to implement...

That does sound cool, though with the HUGE number of different free software out there, and the many questions that could be asked it'd be hell to write. Though I'm sure one could hack together a search frontend which acted somewhat the same.

Well, perhaps this is close:

[code]
#!/bin/bash
# save me as '/usr/bin/packagegod'
# chmod me as a+x
BOLD="\e[1m"
UNBOLD="\e[m"
if [ "$4" != "" ]; then
USE=$4
fi
if [ "$3" != "a" ]; then
USE=$3
fi
if [ "$2" != "need" ]; then
USE=$2
fi
if [ "$1" != "I" ]; then
USE=$1
fi
echo -e "$BOLD I see you need a $USE $UNBOLD"
echo -e "$BOLD The following are available: $UNBOLD\n"
apt-cache search "$USE" | grep -i "$USE" | sort | more
echo -e "\n\n\n$BOLD To install, please type:\n\n\tapt-get install <ITEM>\n\n"
echo -e "...where <ITEM> is an item you saw above.$UNBOLD\n\n"

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17
"libervisco" wrote:

I think that replacing that path bar in nautilus with plain buttons may have not been the best decision either.

Here, here. I most definitely agree. One very aggravating feature disappearance.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

I want to be able to continue using PHP4 for a bit longer. The move to drop PHP4 in favor of PHP5 seemed a bit rushed. Or, perhaps it comes down to my gripes with apt, which I mostly love, but sometimes am frustrated with. I mean, I wish I didn't have to expose my system to universe, multiverse, backports, seaports, omniverse, diverse, and every other verse in order to keep my PHP4 fresh after installing it. I wish I could just update it from a fairly stable source that Canonical has put most of their bets upon.

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

I'd like to see a version of Ubuntu that was locked down for office environments and some remote way that I can enable a feature on a PC to enable an extra feature here or there, such as the ability to save a file locally, or print, or browse beyond the local subnet and onto the Internet, etc.

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04

There are already many offshots of Ubuntu and there can only be more considering it's the most popular distro that's still growing, so something streamlined to what you may need could well become available if it isn't already.

I hear SimplyMEPIS is switching to Ubuntu for its base, though I never really favored that distro because of them including too much unfree stuff in it..

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

Things l'd like to see to get added:

1) All fonts should be in a single directory on the system in a place that makes sense, like /usr/share/fonts. Everything else should just be a softlink to it, if that's even necessary.

2) Replace Nautilus with Thunar.

3) If you do custom partitioning, it needs to be reworked for noobs or 2nd year noobs and needs to ALWAYS ensure that someone didn't forget to add /swap partition.

4) The logo could be better. I like other versions that people have done where they made it 3D and leaned it back slightly.

5) Provide 2 themes that look fantastic -- the blue theme or the brown theme. During the install, you can pick which one you want. You can easily change it later. Personally, I prefer a blue theme with: Glider controls, Clearlooks border, and Human icons.

6) Installation of stuff should make sense:

/etc --> all config files and daemon scripts should go here
/var --> logs, databases, and websites, mostly
/bin --> the oldest, most common, command line tools
/sbin --> symbolic link to /usr/sbin
/usr/bin --> all other binary executables that are not admin-restricted
/usr/sbin --> binary executables that are admin-restricted
/usr/share/fonts --> all fonts, no matter for what app, including Wine, OpenOffice, GNOME, and KDE, whether it require symlinks in other places, or whatever
/usr/share --> install app directories under here such as /usr/share/gnome, etc.
/usr/share/pixmaps --> all images and icons used by the themes, with subdirectories to break that out

7) Need an /etc/startup.sh that is always called once on startup before the GDM loads. People can tack their stuff in that or use the /etc/init.d/skeleton file to create custom daemons.

Cool The install needs to ask if the user wants a taskbar and menubar at the top or at the bottom. In some office environments with noobs who only know Windows, the taskbar and menubar at the bottom is probably more attractive to them. (It is for me as well.)

9) Persuade the OpenOffice.org guys to drop the ".org" off the icons. Pleeeze!!!

10) Dump XMMS in favor of Beep.

11) The server version needs something sort of like command-line yast. It can be built quite easily in Python (a little harder, but possible in pure Bash), with VT100 codes. A third-party group needs to maintain it.

12) Instead of nano being the default command-line editor, I'd like to see 'ne' be used.

13) Fix smbfs mounting so that it's not buggy and is simple to setup.

14) Firewall control panel that manipulates /etc/init.d/firewall Bash script, which has nothing inside but iptables commands. It should be minimalist in security, but fairly decent. Pros can then edit the script it makes to take it even further. Ubuntu should not take the stance, we do not by default enable services and therefore we should not enable a firewall -- that's just stupid.

15) Runlevel editor and call it Services Control Panel.

16) Minimalist PyGTK-based GUI for ssh as another option.

17) An army of usability testing, just like Novell is doing with Suse 10, in order to improve it and get all those bug reports and cosmetic change wishes on sourceforge with the app vendors.

18) Ubuntu should pay some cash to the OpenBSD project, which handles OpenSSH and a dozen other useful, essential things that are included in practically every Linux distro. Their grant just got dumped, evidently.

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08

/sbin should not be a symlink to /usr/sbin in case /usr fails to mount.
I should bookmark this, as I am in the process of creating a package manager and eventually a distribution. (with non-standard locations of stuff, which make sence once you get used to the differences, no exceptions. omg this will need some thinking.)

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

Ha -- what comes after 17) ?

It's 18) .

Do you see a small smilie with sunglasses? PHPBB+ Bug.

free-zombie's picture
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Joined: 2006-03-08
"supermike" wrote:

It's 18) .

Smiling

supermike's picture
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Joined: 2006-02-17

19) A unified PyGTK installer that integrates with an easy to edit Bash script. Without much brain power, developers around the world can hook into this and make their stuff work on Ubuntu, Debian, Slackware, RedHat/Fedora, Suse, and most other major brands of Linux. If it gets approved and added to the Linux system base project -- forgot the name right now -- it will be a defacto standard.

tbuitenh's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-21
"supermike" wrote:

Ha -- what comes after 17) ?

It's 18) .

Do you see a small smilie with sunglasses? PHPBB+ Bug.

Not a bug. Should have disabled smileys. Or perhaps it is a bug and it should not interpret smileys if there is no space before them. That would be a very common bug then, tons of software does the same thing.

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Joined: 2006-08-08
I'm totally new to the Linux

I'm totally new to the Linux experience, and Ubuntu is my first distro. I adore it (if for no other reason than it's not windows), but one thing does irritate me.

As far as I can tell, you can do admin-type things from the command line with sudo, but if you want to do those same admin-type things from the GUI, you have to do all this workaround stuff.

Example: I wanted to edit my sources.list file to enable Universe. I don't like and haven't had time to learn the command-line text editor, so I opened the file in gedit through the GUI. I made the edits easily enough, but then had to save the file as a copy, then go into the command line to move it over to the appropriate directory. I haven't been able to find a sudo-like button in the menus anywhere.

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
gksudo gedit

Shae, you can launch gedit with administrator powers and then you will be able to save the file you're editing directly.

All you have to do is press alt-f2 to bring up the run command dialog and enter gksudo gedit. It will then ask you for your password and open gedit from where you can then easily open your sources.list file, edit it and save it with no additional hassle.

However, that specific task of adding a new repository can be done from synaptic as well. Just go to your applications menu and choose Add/Remove programs, then click on "advanced", enter your password and you'll be in synaptic. I can't quite remember in which menu exactly it was, but you've definitely got the feature for editing repositories in an easy way.

Btw, you can of course start synaptic directly from run command dialog rather than going through "add/remove programs". Smiling

Hopefully this helps, and welcome to Nuxified.org! Smiling

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Joined: 2006-08-08
Thank you. Turns out right

Thank you. Smiling

Turns out right after I wrote that, I was reading a post that told me to sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list which was exactly what I needed.

My only other gripe is that it runs choppy on my virtual machine (I don't have a machine I can dedicate to it yet Sad ) but I'm switching to Xubuntu for that. Laughing out loud

ma_d's picture
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Joined: 2006-07-07
Debian Speed

The builds are optimized as if a Debian team built them... Seriously, no one is running it on a 386!

a thing's picture
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Joined: 2005-12-20
nano

First of all, welcome, shae Smiling

Which "command line editor" are you talking about? For simple stuff, you can use Nano, which really is nano sized — it has about the same amount of features as Windows's Notepad. When you have the time & patience, you should learn Emacs or vi. (I confess I haven't gotten to this in over a year and a half of using GNU/Linux.) In the meantime for bigger edits, use whatever GUI editor you're comfortable with.

By the way, for KDE users, the equivalent of gksudo gedit is kdesu kate.

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Joined: 2006-08-08
nano
a thing wrote:

First of all, welcome, shae Smiling

Which "command line editor" are you talking about? For simple stuff, you can use Nano, which really is nano sized — it has about the same amount of features as Windows's Notepad. When you have the time & patience, you should learn Emacs or vi. (I confess I haven't gotten to this in over a year and a half of using GNU/Linux.) In the meantime for bigger edits, use whatever GUI editor you're comfortable with.

By the way, for KDE users, the equivalent of gksudo gedit is kdesu kate.

To be entirely honest, I'm not sure what the name of the editor is. It is whatever comes up in the terminal screen when you try and edit a file via the command line. Probably vi, from what I've heard of it.

And you're right, I should learn it, but like all things I don't really want to do, it will be put on hold. ^^()

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
Shae, it's best and probably

Shae, it's best and probably easiest to manually launch nano instead of rely on whatever editor the config app launches by default.

For example if you have to edit your xorg.conf file in /etc/X11/ directory just to sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf

Of course, sudo is for getting superpowers and will ask you for your password. Smiling

Even I haven't yet learned much of vi and emacs so no worries. Eye I just stick to nano and kate mostly.

libervisco's picture
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Joined: 2006-05-04
ma_d wrote: The builds are
ma_d wrote:

The builds are optimized as if a Debian team built them... Seriously, no one is running it on a 386!

Yeah, I agree 386 is pretty much obsolete nowadays. 586 or 686 ought to become the default.

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